Robert Heinlein, The Number of The Beast

“He’s a Mad Scientist and I’m his Beautiful Daughter.”

That’s what she said: the oldest cliché in pulp fiction. She wasn’t old enough to remember the pulps.

The thing to do with a silly remark is to fail to hear it. I went on waltzing while taking another look down her evening formal. Nice view. . . . → Read More: Robert Heinlein, The Number of The Beast

Robert Heinlein’s All You Zombies

In a scant handful of pages, Heinlein creates the perfect time travel story of all time and laid the foundation for his World as Myth novels that were written much later than as this was written in in 1958. He has been quoted as saying he wrote it in one day; not really surprising given . . . → Read More: Robert Heinlein’s All You Zombies

Literary Matters: Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

We tend to be fairly enthusiastic about Roger Zelazny around here. He was, after all, one of the foremost figures in science fictions New Wave, and one of the most consistently inventive science fiction and fantasy writers ever. And we’ve reviewed a lot of his work, both novels and, as today, short stories, essays, and . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

I reviewed sometime ago the first three volumes of the six total volumes in this set. So I figured that I was overdue to finish off my reviews of this exemplary collection of everything that this writer did save his novels. (And in a few cases, the genesis of his novels are in these volumes . . . → Read More: Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

Tanya Huff: A Confederation of Valor

A Confederation of Valor is the omnibus edition of Tanya Huff’s first two novels in the Confederation series, Valor’s Choice and The Better Part of Valor. They demonstrate that Huff, whom I first encountered as a writer of sharp, witty urban fantasy, is equally at home in the realm of military sf.

The centerpiece of . . . → Read More: Tanya Huff: A Confederation of Valor

Literary Matters: Pierce Brown: Red Rising

With the onslaught (and I use that word advisedly) of dystopian future/supernatural teen-oriented books and/or movies (and sometimes both) recently . . . well, I’m going to let reviewer Denise Kitashima Dutton set the stage:

Another dystopian future full of young adults who don’t know where they fit in? Nooooo, you cry! You’re sick to . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Pierce Brown: Red Rising

Literary Matters: A Taste of Heinlein’s Dark Side

This is a dark, dark novel. And it’s almost on the edge of science fiction and into the realm of human psychology or social satire, à la Brave New World or Lord of the Flies or even The Road. The contemporary setting, even after the contemporary characters are thrust into the future, makes everything seem . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: A Taste of Heinlein’s Dark Side

Literary Matters: Judging Books by Their Covers and Heinlein’s Star Beast

Immediately after Starman Jones, Heinlein wrote his seventh juvenile novel (ninth or tenth novel, total, if you keep track of that sort of thing). What a reversal. He’d been getting steadily more adult in his writing, perhaps as much because of his increasing clout and the resulting power reversal between him and his editors as . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Judging Books by Their Covers and Heinlein’s Star Beast

Literary Matters: Heinlein and Hot Streaks

So, Heinlein’s first four juveniles were a nice warm-up. Rocket Ship Galileo was just fine for a first effort, while Farmer in the Sky is, even now, one of my all-time Heinlein favourites. Not just a favourite from amongst his juveniles, mind you. A favourite, period. What did he do next? A little something called . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Heinlein and Hot Streaks

Matthew Jarpe: Radio Freefall

Matthew Jarpe’s debut novel, Radio Freefall, is good hard science fiction about good hard rock and roll.

Fast-forward Earth a couple decades. A mysterious older musician known only as Aqualung has emerged from the desert with not much more than the clothes on his back and a custom painted vintage 1988 Les Paul Classic guitar. . . . → Read More: Matthew Jarpe: Radio Freefall