K.W. Jeter and Gareth Jefferson Jones: Death’s Apprentice

Death’s Apprentice is a book that really, really wants to be a movie. The story of three unlikely heroes who band together to defeat the Devil himself, it suffers from by-the-numbers plotting, on the nose writing, and paper-thin characters who go where the plot leads willy-nilly. It all ends in a messy small-scale Amageddon, complete . . . → Read More: K.W. Jeter and Gareth Jefferson Jones: Death’s Apprentice

Steven Brust and Skyler White: The Incrementalists

In my view, a new novel by Steven Brust is something to be eagerly awaited. And when he collaborates with another writer, the results can be both unexpected and very rewarding. And so, I opened The Incrementalists with a large measure of anticipation.

The Incrementalists are a group who have been guiding humanity toward a . . . → Read More: Steven Brust and Skyler White: The Incrementalists

Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Rough Rider

Mike Resnick, as I’m sure I’ve stated before somewhere – probably here – is one of those writers who should not need an introduction. He’s one of most prolific – and versatile – writers in science fiction, and one of the most awarded, having won five Hugos and been nominated thirty-seven other times. If you . . . → Read More: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Rough Rider

Elizabeth Bear: Book of Iron

With Book of Iron, Elizabeth Bear pays another visit to the world of Bijou the Artificer, the Wizard of Messaline who makes creatures out of bone, jewels, and metal and who embarks on adventures, whom we first met in Bone and Jewel Creatures.

Bijou and her fellow adventurers, Prince Salih, second son of the Bey, . . . → Read More: Elizabeth Bear: Book of Iron

Chelsea Quinn Yarbro: Night Pilgrims

In literature, films, and television virtually choked with vampires, Yarbro’s Count Saint-Germain remains the suede, the elite, the unique. You won’t find Saint-Germain gnawing on bloody kills, wallowing in gratuitous violence, or throwing blatant sexuality around either. No. His vampiric encounters are tastefully erotic, and the very detail that the Count is a vampire is . . . → Read More: Chelsea Quinn Yarbro: Night Pilgrims

And for your reading pleasure . . .

We have books. (Big surprise, that.)

First, let’s see what’s in store in Brandon Sanderson’s The Emperor’s Soul — how do you rebuild an Emperor in 100 days (or less)? Hint: failure is not an option.

Next, an anthology assembled by John Joseph Adams, Epic: Legends of Fantasy, that puts heroic fantasy in a new . . . → Read More: And for your reading pleasure . . .

Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Zombie

There’s actually a fairly long history for the fantasy detective genre, going back at least to Randall Garrett’s stories of Lord Darcy from the 1960s. The genre has enjoyed a roster of stellar practitioners — Michael Moorcock, Glenn Cook, Steven Brust, Tanya Huff, to name just a few. Add to that list Mike Resnick, who . . . → Read More: Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Zombie

You Were Warned

And here I am, back again with more reviews. Hmm — where to start?

Zombies! Cant’ live with ‘em, can’t live without ‘em — which seems to hold true for some people, at least. Christopher Golden has come out with an anthology that reinvents the zombie, according to our reviewer — 21st Century Dead. Or . . . → Read More: You Were Warned

Ellen Kushner: Mannerpunk, Klezmer, and English ballads

Let the fairy-tale begin on a winter’s morning, then, with one drop of blood new-fallen on the ivory snow: a drop as bright as a clear-cut ruby, red as the single spot of claret on the lace cuff.

And thus starts Swordspoint: A Melodrama of Manners, the first novel in the Riverside series by Ellen . . . → Read More: Ellen Kushner: Mannerpunk, Klezmer, and English ballads

Thought I’d Pop Over

and lend a hand with an update. There’s a few things in the hopper worth your time, I think.

First up, a fun little book from Glen Cook. Fun? you say? From Glen Cook? Yep. Take a look at Sung in Blood to see what I mean.

Ever hear of MI37? Thought not. There’s a . . . → Read More: Thought I’d Pop Over