Literary Matters: Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

We tend to be fairly enthusiastic about Roger Zelazny around here. He was, after all, one of the foremost figures in science fictions New Wave, and one of the most consistently inventive science fiction and fantasy writers ever. And we’ve reviewed a lot of his work, both novels and, as today, short stories, essays, and . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

Simon R. Green: Once in A Blue Moon

At what appeared to be the end of the Forest Kingdom series, Prince Rupert and Princess Julia, also known as Hawk and Fisher, the only honest City Guards in the corrupt city of Haven, have saved the Forest Kingdom from falling to the rule of Demon Prince and all the other creatures of the longest . . . → Read More: Simon R. Green: Once in A Blue Moon

Steven Brust: The Khaavren Romances

The Phoenix Guards (Tor, 1992) Five Hundred Years After (Tor, 1994) The Viscount of Adrilankha (Tor, 2002) The Paths of the Dead (Tor, 2002) The Lord of Castle Black (Tor, 2003) Sethra Lavode (Tor, 2003)

That somewhat dizzying array of titles may give some indication of the scope of the series that Steven Brust calls . . . → Read More: Steven Brust: The Khaavren Romances

Literary Matters: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

There are lessons in Lucius Shepard’s Beautiful Blood, as reviewer Richard Dansky informs us.

It tells us that art slays dragons, no matter how large or powerful they may be.

It tells us that art takes a very long time to slay dragons, and that the dragon will be unaware of the poison that . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

Here is what Beautiful Blood, the last book in the late Lucius Shepard’s story-cycle of the Dragon Griaule, tells us.

It tells us that art slays dragons, no matter how large or powerful they may be.

It tells us that art takes a very long time to slay dragons, and that the dragon will be . . . → Read More: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

Literary Matters: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

We tend to think of the Green Man as a woodsy, countryside sort of figure, but there’s no reason that has to be the case. So, we have an anthology of short stories on the theme of the Urban Green Man, edited by Adria Laycraft and Janice Blaine.

Richard Dansky took a look at . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

Themed anthologies carry with them an inherent risk. Make the topic too broad and there’s no sense of cohesion among the stories. Make it too narrowly focused – the apocryphal “vampire cockroach anthology” David Niall Wilson once threatened to publish standing as prime example – and the risk is that in order to fit, the . . . → Read More: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

Literary Matters: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Well, we’re back in working order, the pixies have been shooed away, and we have another review for you, this one of Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Dinosaurs, the latest in his Tales of the Weird West.

Interesting premise: two practitioners of the budding science of paleontology are digging for dinosaur bones — but . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

The Doctor and the Dinosaurs is the latest in Mike Resnick’s Weird West Tales, featuring Doc Holliday, Tom Edison, Ned Buntline, and, back for an encore, Teddy Roosevelt. And once again, Goyathlay, known to the white man as Geronimo, is the motive force.

Doc Holliday is on his last legs. Well, he’s actually flat on . . . → Read More: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Charles Stross: Equoid

At first glance, it’s easy to see why Charles Stross’ Equoid won such fan affection. After all, it’s stuffed to the gills with fanservice. A standalone novella tucked neatly into the existing timeline of Stross’ ongoing The-Office-On-The-Mistkatonic series of novels about the Laundry, it wastes no time letting the reader know that a whole bunch . . . → Read More: Charles Stross: Equoid