Literary Matters: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

There are lessons in Lucius Shepard’s Beautiful Blood, as reviewer Richard Dansky informs us.

It tells us that art slays dragons, no matter how large or powerful they may be.

It tells us that art takes a very long time to slay dragons, and that the dragon will be unaware of the poison that . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

Here is what Beautiful Blood, the last book in the late Lucius Shepard’s story-cycle of the Dragon Griaule, tells us.

It tells us that art slays dragons, no matter how large or powerful they may be.

It tells us that art takes a very long time to slay dragons, and that the dragon will be . . . → Read More: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

Literary Matters: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

We tend to think of the Green Man as a woodsy, countryside sort of figure, but there’s no reason that has to be the case. So, we have an anthology of short stories on the theme of the Urban Green Man, edited by Adria Laycraft and Janice Blaine.

Richard Dansky took a look at . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

Themed anthologies carry with them an inherent risk. Make the topic too broad and there’s no sense of cohesion among the stories. Make it too narrowly focused – the apocryphal “vampire cockroach anthology” David Niall Wilson once threatened to publish standing as prime example – and the risk is that in order to fit, the . . . → Read More: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

Literary Matters: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Well, we’re back in working order, the pixies have been shooed away, and we have another review for you, this one of Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Dinosaurs, the latest in his Tales of the Weird West.

Interesting premise: two practitioners of the budding science of paleontology are digging for dinosaur bones — but . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

The Doctor and the Dinosaurs is the latest in Mike Resnick’s Weird West Tales, featuring Doc Holliday, Tom Edison, Ned Buntline, and, back for an encore, Teddy Roosevelt. And once again, Goyathlay, known to the white man as Geronimo, is the motive force.

Doc Holliday is on his last legs. Well, he’s actually flat on . . . → Read More: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Charles Stross: Equoid

At first glance, it’s easy to see why Charles Stross’ Equoid won such fan affection. After all, it’s stuffed to the gills with fanservice. A standalone novella tucked neatly into the existing timeline of Stross’ ongoing The-Office-On-The-Mistkatonic series of novels about the Laundry, it wastes no time letting the reader know that a whole bunch . . . → Read More: Charles Stross: Equoid

Literary Matters: Glen Cook: Working God’s Mischief

Arnhand, Castauriga, and Navaya lost their kings. The Grail Empire lost its empress. The Church lost its Patriarch, though he lives on as a fugitive. The Night lost Kharoulke the Windwalker, an emperor amongst the most primal and terrible gods. The Night goes on, in dread. The world goes on, in dread. The ice . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Glen Cook: Working God’s Mischief

Glen Cook: Working God’s Mischief

It’s been too long a wait, but the next book of Glen Cook’s The Instrumentalities of the Night has finally made its appearance. It’s hard to know how to lead into this one, so I’m going to let Cook do it:

Arnhand, Castauriga, and Navaya lost their kings. The Grail Empire lost its empress. The . . . → Read More: Glen Cook: Working God’s Mischief

Literary Matters: It’s Been a Nasty Winter

For some of us, at least. Fortunately, some hardy souls have managed to defy the elements and send in some new reviews, so let’s take a look.

First, Death’s Apprentice from K. W. Jeter and Gareth Jefferson Jones, featuring, among other things, a killer for hire to works for the Devil.

Next up, from steampunk . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: It’s Been a Nasty Winter