Paddy in The Smoke

Auld Triangle, Finsbury Park, London, England

The Auld Triangle is a three-cornered building sitting at a three-way intersection in a quiet neighborhood in Finsbury Park. Sunday nights, if there’s no Arsenal match (if there is, there’s no session), usually find the pub stuffed to the gills with Irish expats. You will usually find James Carty . . . → Read More: Paddy in The Smoke

In Good Company: Nell Gywnne’s On Land and At Sea

“Posthumous collaborations” tend to have a somewhat uneven track record. For every Poodle Springs, you’ve got a handful of “Lurker at the Threshold”s, whereby the fit in prose, storytelling, and vision between the original, deceased author and the one stepping in to finish the tale isn’t quite perfect. Even when it’s one elite author picking . . . → Read More: In Good Company: Nell Gywnne’s On Land and At Sea

Roots & Branches

As well as co-incidentally being part of the subtitle of Green Man Review, Roots & Branches is also the name of a long-running “folk, roots & beyond” radio show on community station Three D Radio in Adelaide, Australia, hosted by me since 1985.  As well as playing new releases and rarities, over the years the . . . → Read More: Roots & Branches

A Pair From Graham Joyce

With Some Kind of Fairy Tale, Graham Joyce sets up camp in the literary real estate generally occupied by Charles De Lint. But where De Lint’s approach is artfully bohemian, Joyce’s is much more workaday. He takes on the intersection of Faerie and the everyday world with muscular, gritty prose and an eye for how . . . → Read More: A Pair From Graham Joyce

Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Zombie

There’s actually a fairly long history for the fantasy detective genre, going back at least to Randall Garrett’s stories of Lord Darcy from the 1960s. The genre has enjoyed a roster of stellar practitioners — Michael Moorcock, Glenn Cook, Steven Brust, Tanya Huff, to name just a few. Add to that list Mike Resnick, who . . . → Read More: Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Zombie

Madeleine L’Engle’s The Time Quartet

As far as I am concerned, Madeleine L’Engle’s books should be required reading in all schools, as they open doors — not only in the imagination, but also in the academics, math and science especially. These wonderful tales could inspire the next Einstein to take the proper courses and feed his mind. I enjoyed the . . . → Read More: Madeleine L’Engle’s The Time Quartet

A Horse flies side-project

The Horse Flies are one of the best Americana bands playing now and their side-projects are just interesting as the many, many recordings the band has released down the last several decades.

Late Last Summer, an album of waltzes by Horseflies violinist Judy Hyman and her dad, Dick had its ‘official’ release date on . . . → Read More: A Horse flies side-project

Le Vent du Nord marks 10th anniversary with new release, rare Western U.S. tour

Le Vent du Nord

Internationally renowned Quebecois quartet Le Vent du Nord (The North Wind) is marking 10 years since its first release with a new recording and a November tour of the Western United States.

Fresh from touring Down Under and from a gala celebration in Montreal, the band’s U.S. tour stops will . . . → Read More: Le Vent du Nord marks 10th anniversary with new release, rare Western U.S. tour

Revisiting the Visible McKillip

If a reader reads a fairytale once and never picks it up again, need has been satisfied. If a reader willingly reads a fairytale nineteen times, even in that many different versions, I think it’s because the need for that particular tale hasn’t been resolved, deep in the place where imagination and symbols, emotions and . . . → Read More: Revisiting the Visible McKillip

The Blind Harper Dances

John O’Regan found The Blind Harper Dances — Modern English Country Dances set to airs by Turlough O’Carolan from Squirrel Hill Press a decade ago to be a reviewing challenge:

This book is at once fascinating and difficult to review. The fascination lies in the idea of combining the music of Turlough O’Carolan with modern . . . → Read More: The Blind Harper Dances