Kate Griffin: The Minority Council

The Minority Council, the fourth novel in Kate Griffin’s Midnight Mayor series, puts Matthew Swift, the current Midnight Mayor of London, is more peril of his and the Electric Blue Angels’ existence than in any of the previous novels as an evil far greater than anything he (they) have faced before is loose upon London.

. . . → Read More: Kate Griffin: The Minority Council

Brief Lines: Vampires, Factory Monsters, and Old Ghosts

Recent years have seen a veritable explosion of shorter works in the horror field, with some of the most reputable names in the genre contributing entries and numerous others following in their footsteps. It’s been argued that the novella is the preferred length for horror fiction; long enough to build up suspense and a decent . . . → Read More: Brief Lines: Vampires, Factory Monsters, and Old Ghosts

There’s Still Time

To pick up some last-minute New Year’s gifts — take a look at what we’ve got here today.

We start off today with a couple of novels from Iain M. Banks, who comes up with some doozies — as in Surface Detail, a novel of the Culture, in which a sex slave is after revenge . . . → Read More: There’s Still Time

Revels

The Revels are a tradition unto themselves. We have a look at them today, first this year’s CD, Strike the Harp, which gives a good idea of this year’s Revels, and then a look at the show (celebration?) itself. the 2012 Revels at the Sanders Theater in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

And if you want to know . . . → Read More: Revels

Quantum Thief series wrap-up

Have you checked out this new series from Finn-born Edinburgher, Hannu Rajaniemi? Though it was published back in 2010 in the UK, The Quantum Thief only came stateside about one year ago, giving newly converted fans a mercifully short wait for the sequel, which was just released. I think I read the two within three . . . → Read More: Quantum Thief series wrap-up

And for your reading pleasure . . .

We have books. (Big surprise, that.)

First, let’s see what’s in store in Brandon Sanderson’s The Emperor’s Soul — how do you rebuild an Emperor in 100 days (or less)? Hint: failure is not an option.

Next, an anthology assembled by John Joseph Adams, Epic: Legends of Fantasy, that puts heroic fantasy in a new . . . → Read More: And for your reading pleasure . . .

The Year in Review: Charles de Lint

Here at the Kinrowan Estate, which publishes Green Man Review and Sleeping Hedgehog, Charles de Lint is one of our favourite writers, with both his music and writing being among the best we’ve seen this year. And this was the year that de Lint moved in the digital realm in a serious way!

Years . . . → Read More: The Year in Review: Charles de Lint

Paddy in The Smoke

Auld Triangle, Finsbury Park, London, England

The Auld Triangle is a three-cornered building sitting at a three-way intersection in a quiet neighborhood in Finsbury Park. Sunday nights, if there’s no Arsenal match (if there is, there’s no session), usually find the pub stuffed to the gills with Irish expats. You will usually find James Carty . . . → Read More: Paddy in The Smoke

In Good Company: Nell Gywnne’s On Land and At Sea

“Posthumous collaborations” tend to have a somewhat uneven track record. For every Poodle Springs, you’ve got a handful of “Lurker at the Threshold”s, whereby the fit in prose, storytelling, and vision between the original, deceased author and the one stepping in to finish the tale isn’t quite perfect. Even when it’s one elite author picking . . . → Read More: In Good Company: Nell Gywnne’s On Land and At Sea

Roots & Branches

As well as co-incidentally being part of the subtitle of Green Man Review, Roots & Branches is also the name of a long-running “folk, roots & beyond” radio show on community station Three D Radio in Adelaide, Australia, hosted by me since 1985.  As well as playing new releases and rarities, over the years the . . . → Read More: Roots & Branches