Rick Hautala

Rick Hautala, well-known horror writer and well-liked person, passed away this week from a heart attack. Cristopher Golden, a past Oak King here and a fine writer in his own regard, sent out this letter in hopes of heliping Holly, his widow, with her finances:

Dear friends,

            I don’t have the words to put Rick . . . → Read More: Rick Hautala

A Little Something to Ease Re-Entry

Everyone seems to be recovering from yesterday’s festivities, so I ducked over to lend a hand with some new reviews for you.

Let’s start out with the next installment in Leona Wisoker’s Children of the Desert, Bells of the Kingdom. Brace yourself — it’s strong stuff.

Next, from the world of the Northern Kingdom and . . . → Read More: A Little Something to Ease Re-Entry

Anaïs Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer: Child Ballads

American singer-songwriters Anaïs Mitchell and Jefferson Hamer have taken something of a middle tack in their superb little album Child Ballads. They do take a strictly acoustic and folk approach, but with arrangements and production that somehow have a modern feel to them. . . . → Read More: Anaïs Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer: Child . . . → Read More: Anaïs Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer: Child Ballads

And The Word Was Spoken

‘Tell me just this, if it is not a secret: what other great powers are there besides the light?’   ‘It is no secret. All power is one in source and end, I think. Years and distances, stars and candles, water and wind and wizardry, the craft in a man’s hand and the wisdom in . . . → Read More: And The Word Was Spoken

Mary Jane Lamond & Wendy MacIsaac: Seinn

It’s hard to believe that, as I write this, it’s been just over 10 years since I experienced the music of Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton Island in its own environment, at the International Celtic Colours Festival in 2002. I wasn’t then and I’m not now any kind of authority on Celtic music, but I know . . . → Read More: Mary Jane Lamond & Wendy MacIsaac: Seinn

An Americana Website Worth Your Time

I found this superb site the other day:

Foxbeard.com is a blog about Americana & Folk music. Originally MahoganyFolk.com we renamed and updated the blog in December 2012.

We are here to share great music, and help promote Americana & Folk music. We search high and low, we receive submissions from signed, PR, and independent . . . → Read More: An Americana Website Worth Your Time

Carthy, Hardy, Farrell & Young: Laylam

Laylam which [Eliza] Carthy says means “chorus,” is a showcase for the group’s four-part harmonies and the interplay of their four fiddles, in combinations that include violins, viola and cello. It’s also an excitingly diverse selection of songs in a range of styles, from old English folk to American jazz, pop, country, and spirituals, plus . . . → Read More: Carthy, Hardy, Farrell & Young: Laylam

Brief Lines: Not So Long Ago, In A Place Far Away

To venture into the fantastic is to step onto unfamiliar ground. Some works do this figuratively, populating familiar locations with vampires, werewolves and other critters. Others prefer to be more literal, moving plot and characters at one feel swoop off to a distant landscape that often bears as much resemblance to the real location it’s . . . → Read More: Brief Lines: Not So Long Ago, In A Place Far Away

Irish traditional music for your consideration

In the rather small world of Irish traditional musicians, Eliot Grasso has been widely considered one of the best uilleann pipers playing today; Dave Cory has always been one of the hottest of the rock’n’roll tenor banjo hotshots. North by Northwest, recorded in 2006, isn’t going to tarnish the luster of their reputations.

“Dave and I . . . → Read More: Irish traditional music for your consideration

Kate Griffin: The Minority Council

The Minority Council, the fourth novel in Kate Griffin’s Midnight Mayor series, puts Matthew Swift, the current Midnight Mayor of London, is more peril of his and the Electric Blue Angels’ existence than in any of the previous novels as an evil far greater than anything he (they) have faced before is loose upon London.

. . . → Read More: Kate Griffin: The Minority Council