Fey Folklore

I have gone out and seen the lands of Faery, And have found sorrow and peace and beauty there, And have not known one from the other, but found each Lovely and gracious alike, delicate and fair.

“Dreams within Dreams” by Fiona Macleod

Open your eyes to the world around you. There are things . . . → Read More: Fey Folklore

Charles de Lint’s Tamson House

Sara Kendell once read somewhere that the tale of the world is like a tree. The tale, she understood, did not so much mean the niggling occurrences of daily life. Rather it encompassed the grand stories that caused some change in the world and were remembered in ensuing years as, if not histories, at least . . . → Read More: Charles de Lint’s Tamson House

Robin Hood Redux

Take no scorn to wear the horn It was the crest when you were born Your father’s father wore it And your father wore it to Robin Hood and Little John Have both gone to the fair o and we will to the merry green wood To hunt the buck and hare o

‘Hal-N-Tow’ . . . → Read More: Robin Hood Redux

Robin Hood

What better to invoke an English midsummer than the Robin Hood legend?

Sara Kendell once read somewhere that the tale of the world is like a tree. The tale, she understood, did not so much mean the niggling occurrences of daily life. Rather it encompassed the grand stories that caused some change in the world . . . → Read More: Robin Hood

Favourite Reference Works

Do you know that Peter S. Beagle adapted his ‘Come, Lady Death’ from his Fantasy World of Peter S. Beagle collection into a libretto for an opera, The Midnight Angel, which was written by David Carlson for the Glimmerglass Opera Company? Or that Charles de lint did a sweet — pun fully intended! — online tale about his immortal Crow . . . → Read More: Favourite Reference Works

The Stories of Hans Christian Anderson: An Appreciation

What better invokes the feeling of Winter than ‘Sneedronningen’ or as English speaking readers know it, ‘The Snow Queen’ by Danish storyteller Hans Christian Andersen which was first published nearly one hundred and eighty years ago? What storyteller is to this day more beloved this writer?

Well, his stories at any rate. Our archives . . . → Read More: The Stories of Hans Christian Anderson: An Appreciation

A Midsummer Story

Our Summer Queen Story this summer comes from Jennifer Stevenson who never dreamed she would become Summer Queen someday. Let alone repeat six years later as she is doing.

She attended the University of Iowa and Southern Connecticut State University, studying music, English, and structural family theory. She rides horses and swims every day. . . . → Read More: A Midsummer Story

Midsummer Reading Suggestions

I too like old jokes; I like all sorts of old things — old friends, old books, old poems, old plays. An old favorite had started our evening: Midsummer Night’s Dream presented by Halifax Ballet Theater with Luanna Pauline as Titania. Low gravity ballet, live actors, and magical holograms had created a fairyland Will Shakespeare . . . → Read More: Midsummer Reading Suggestions

A Summer Story from Peter S. Beagle

Midsomer, as it is sometimes called by our more trad minded staff, is upon us which means that Peter S. Beagle, one of our revered Oak Kings, has a story called ‘Mr. McCaslin’  for us.

Oh, you want to know what Peter’s tale is about? A fortnight ago, Peter told me in the Pub . . . → Read More: A Summer Story from Peter S. Beagle

Poor Dead Jack

No, not our Jack.

Reynard here. I got drafted by Jack to write these notes this outing as he and the other musicians in the building are celebrating a new band that Bela, our resident Balkan violinist, formed this week. Now I admit that the composition of the various bands and the names of bands . . . → Read More: Poor Dead Jack