A quick music update

It’s late afternoon on a perfect summer day (mid Twenties, cooling breeze) so the Neverending Session has decamped to the courtyard to sit under the Hanging Oaks and play more than a bit of John Playford’s compositions; the punters here decided to follow them as there’s a cask of St. George Nut Brown Ale on . . . → Read More: A quick music update

More of Everything

Well, more books and music, and that should be enough. Hi, it’s me again, and we’ve got some really interesting things for you today.

From the folklore of the Levant East comes Ron J. Suresha’s The Uncommon Sense of the Immortal Mullah Nasruddin, a retelling of tales of the Middle Eastern Wise Fool. And as . . . → Read More: More of Everything

A Little Miscellany

Well, yes and no — I’m here doing a substitute gig for your regular posters, and I have to admit, what I mean by “miscellany” at Sleeping Hedgehog is not what I mean my “miscellany” here. However . . . .

We’ve got books, which is pretty normal. We’re starting off with a collection of . . . → Read More: A Little Miscellany

Blood Wedding

Jack Merry here. Let me put aside Emma Bull’s Finder: A Novel of the Borderland which I’ve been reading this foggy evening. Do have a pint of Dragons Breath XXXX Stout with me while I tell you a tale…

Depending on how you figure it, it’s either late summer or early fall here on the . . . → Read More: Blood Wedding

The Lord of The Forest

Some hold that the Green Man is but a Celtic myth retold by the English as a sort of ethnic cleansing of the native culture. That is bullocks as there’s really no Green Men in English myth either no matter what Lady Raglan claimed backed in the period between the Wars.. But there is a . . . → Read More: The Lord of The Forest

Fey Folklore

I have gone out and seen the lands of Faery, And have found sorrow and peace and beauty there, And have not known one from the other, but found each Lovely and gracious alike, delicate and fair.

“Dreams within Dreams” by Fiona Macleod

Open your eyes to the world around you. There are things . . . → Read More: Fey Folklore

Charles de Lint’s Tamson House

Sara Kendell once read somewhere that the tale of the world is like a tree. The tale, she understood, did not so much mean the niggling occurrences of daily life. Rather it encompassed the grand stories that caused some change in the world and were remembered in ensuing years as, if not histories, at least . . . → Read More: Charles de Lint’s Tamson House

Robin Hood Redux

Take no scorn to wear the horn It was the crest when you were born Your father’s father wore it And your father wore it to Robin Hood and Little John Have both gone to the fair o and we will to the merry green wood To hunt the buck and hare o

‘Hal-N-Tow’ . . . → Read More: Robin Hood Redux

Robin Hood

What better to invoke an English midsummer than the Robin Hood legend?

Sara Kendell once read somewhere that the tale of the world is like a tree. The tale, she understood, did not so much mean the niggling occurrences of daily life. Rather it encompassed the grand stories that caused some change in the world . . . → Read More: Robin Hood

Favourite Reference Works

Do you know that Peter S. Beagle adapted his ‘Come, Lady Death’ from his Fantasy World of Peter S. Beagle collection into a libretto for an opera, The Midnight Angel, which was written by David Carlson for the Glimmerglass Opera Company? Or that Charles de lint did a sweet — pun fully intended! — online tale about his immortal Crow . . . → Read More: Favourite Reference Works