Brief Lines: Vampires, Factory Monsters, and Old Ghosts

Recent years have seen a veritable explosion of shorter works in the horror field, with some of the most reputable names in the genre contributing entries and numerous others following in their footsteps. It’s been argued that the novella is the preferred length for horror fiction; long enough to build up suspense and a decent . . . → Read More: Brief Lines: Vampires, Factory Monsters, and Old Ghosts

There’s Still Time

To pick up some last-minute New Year’s gifts — take a look at what we’ve got here today.

We start off today with a couple of novels from Iain M. Banks, who comes up with some doozies — as in Surface Detail, a novel of the Culture, in which a sex slave is after revenge . . . → Read More: There’s Still Time

Quantum Thief series wrap-up

Have you checked out this new series from Finn-born Edinburgher, Hannu Rajaniemi? Though it was published back in 2010 in the UK, The Quantum Thief only came stateside about one year ago, giving newly converted fans a mercifully short wait for the sequel, which was just released. I think I read the two within three . . . → Read More: Quantum Thief series wrap-up

And for your reading pleasure . . .

We have books. (Big surprise, that.)

First, let’s see what’s in store in Brandon Sanderson’s The Emperor’s Soul — how do you rebuild an Emperor in 100 days (or less)? Hint: failure is not an option.

Next, an anthology assembled by John Joseph Adams, Epic: Legends of Fantasy, that puts heroic fantasy in a new . . . → Read More: And for your reading pleasure . . .

The Year in Review: Charles de Lint

Here at the Kinrowan Estate, which publishes Green Man Review and Sleeping Hedgehog, Charles de Lint is one of our favourite writers, with both his music and writing being among the best we’ve seen this year. And this was the year that de Lint moved in the digital realm in a serious way!

Years . . . → Read More: The Year in Review: Charles de Lint

In Good Company: Nell Gywnne’s On Land and At Sea

“Posthumous collaborations” tend to have a somewhat uneven track record. For every Poodle Springs, you’ve got a handful of “Lurker at the Threshold”s, whereby the fit in prose, storytelling, and vision between the original, deceased author and the one stepping in to finish the tale isn’t quite perfect. Even when it’s one elite author picking . . . → Read More: In Good Company: Nell Gywnne’s On Land and At Sea

Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Zombie

There’s actually a fairly long history for the fantasy detective genre, going back at least to Randall Garrett’s stories of Lord Darcy from the 1960s. The genre has enjoyed a roster of stellar practitioners — Michael Moorcock, Glenn Cook, Steven Brust, Tanya Huff, to name just a few. Add to that list Mike Resnick, who . . . → Read More: Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Zombie

Madeleine L’Engle’s The Time Quartet

As far as I am concerned, Madeleine L’Engle’s books should be required reading in all schools, as they open doors — not only in the imagination, but also in the academics, math and science especially. These wonderful tales could inspire the next Einstein to take the proper courses and feed his mind. I enjoyed the . . . → Read More: Madeleine L’Engle’s The Time Quartet

Revisiting the Visible McKillip

If a reader reads a fairytale once and never picks it up again, need has been satisfied. If a reader willingly reads a fairytale nineteen times, even in that many different versions, I think it’s because the need for that particular tale hasn’t been resolved, deep in the place where imagination and symbols, emotions and . . . → Read More: Revisiting the Visible McKillip

The Blind Harper Dances

John O’Regan found The Blind Harper Dances — Modern English Country Dances set to airs by Turlough O’Carolan from Squirrel Hill Press a decade ago to be a reviewing challenge:

This book is at once fascinating and difficult to review. The fascination lies in the idea of combining the music of Turlough O’Carolan with modern . . . → Read More: The Blind Harper Dances