Glen Cook: The Tyranny of the Night / Lord of the Silent Kingdom

I’ve been an admirer of Glen Cook’s writing for many years, ever since I read Shadowline, the first book of the Starfishers series, way back when. I had never run into anyone who had quite that mix of myth and space opera, with the possible exception of Roger Zelazny, and Zelazny was not doing quite . . . → Read More: Glen Cook: The Tyranny of the Night / Lord of the Silent Kingdom

Glen Cook: Working God’s Mischief

Arnhand, Castauriga, and Navaya lost their kings. The Grail Empire lost its empress. The Church lost its Patriarch, though he lives on as a fugitive. The Night lost Kharoulke the Windwalker, an emperor amongst the most primal and terrible gods. The Night goes on, in dread. The world goes on, in dread. The ice . . . → Read More: Glen Cook: Working God’s Mischief

Thoughts on a new illustrated edition of The Hobbit

J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit has a long and colorful publishing history as one of the most beloved fantasy tales of all time. That history continues with a new edition that seems to be aimed at reclaiming the written version of the story as a way to introduce it to young readers. It’s a handsome hardcover . . . → Read More: Thoughts on a new illustrated edition of The Hobbit

It’s Been a Nasty Winter

For some of us, at least. Fortunately, some hardy souls have managed to defy the elements and send in some new reviews, so let’s take a look.

First, Death’s Apprentice from K. W. Jeter and Gareth Jefferson Jones, featuring, among other things, a killer for hire to works for the Devil.

Next up, from steampunk . . . → Read More: It’s Been a Nasty Winter

Literary Matters: Catherynne M. Valente’s Fairyland novels

Twisted fairy tales, revisions and reversions of old legends and mythologies, turning everyday life inside out and at odd angles to itself, bringing Old Magic into a Today World–it’s all the province of names like Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett–and Catherynne M. Valente. As with those authors, Valente has already established cross-media ties; notably, songs by . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Catherynne M. Valente’s Fairyland novels

Brief Lines: Big Names

One of the benefits of the recent upsurge in novellas being published is the opportunity for big names to play in smaller sandboxes. Works that are perhaps too experimental or too insubstantial for full novel-length projects can get play now, providing readers with more of their favorite authors. Meanwhile, the authors themselves get a chance . . . → Read More: Brief Lines: Big Names

Colcannon: The Pooka and the Fiddler and Happy as Larry

Ahhh, there you are. I saw you sitting over in Falstaff’s Chair by the cheerfully cracklin’ fire on this cold, windy, and even rainy night. I see you’re enjoying your novel… Me? I’m reading de Lint’s Moonheart — perhaps his best known work. Not all great literature comes in the form of the printed page . . . → Read More: Colcannon: The Pooka and the Fiddler and Happy as Larry

Catching Up

We have reviews for you. Yes, indeedy, so, since it’s been a while, let’s get right to it.

Comics creator Joe Mignola ventures into the realm of “illustrated novel” with collaborator Christopher Golden in Joe Golem and the Drowned City.

Elizabeth Bear is back with another tale of Bijou the Artificer and her fellow adventurers, . . . → Read More: Catching Up

Brief Lines: Darker Images

A dark man, a dark house, and a place that is just plain dark – this week’s column dives into some graphic literature that sits a bit more on the shadowy side. Horror comics may have gotten a bum rap as unworthy during the EC comics days (not to mention all the horrorsploitation stuff Marvel . . . → Read More: Brief Lines: Darker Images

Wellman Well Done: The Complete John Thunstone

Where Nightshade’s epic five-volume set gathered together all of Manly Wade Wellman’s extant short fiction, The Complete John Thunstone instead focuses on all of the appearances of that singular character. While not as well known as Wellman’s signature character John the Balladeer, Thunstone actually predates him; his appearance in “The Third Cry to Legba” dates . . . → Read More: Wellman Well Done: The Complete John Thunstone