Musical Matters: Capercaillie: To the Moon

To the Moon was my first exposure to Capercaillie, so of course, it was what’s generally considered their “crossover” album. This is by no means a negative, or even something that’s very obvious: it’s more apparent in the rhythm patterns, the instrumentation (sorry, but no one is going to persuade me that the bouzouki is . . . → Read More: Musical Matters: Capercaillie: To the Moon

Catching Up

We have reviews for you. Yes, indeedy, so, since it’s been a while, let’s get right to it.

Comics creator Joe Mignola ventures into the realm of “illustrated novel” with collaborator Christopher Golden in Joe Golem and the Drowned City.

Elizabeth Bear is back with another tale of Bijou the Artificer and her fellow adventurers, . . . → Read More: Catching Up

Leona Wisoker: Fires of the Desert

Fires of the Desert is Book Four of Leona Wisoker’s series, Children of the Desert, and, just when you thought things couldn’t get more complex and difficult, they do, although thankfully the darkness of Bells of the Kingdom is ameliorated.

The geographic center of this one is Bright Bay, seat of King Oruen of the . . . → Read More: Leona Wisoker: Fires of the Desert

Isaac Asimov’s Foundation trilogy

Isaac Asimov’s Foundation trilogy is inarguably one of the seminal works of modern science fiction. It was one of the first to take its inspiration from the social sciences rather than the physical sciences (Gernsback’s formula of “better living through technology” had received a serious blow with the first use of the atomic bomb in . . . → Read More: Isaac Asimov’s Foundation trilogy

A Little Something to Ease Re-Entry

Everyone seems to be recovering from yesterday’s festivities, so I ducked over to lend a hand with some new reviews for you.

Let’s start out with the next installment in Leona Wisoker’s Children of the Desert, Bells of the Kingdom. Brace yourself — it’s strong stuff.

Next, from the world of the Northern Kingdom and . . . → Read More: A Little Something to Ease Re-Entry

There’s Still Time

To pick up some last-minute New Year’s gifts — take a look at what we’ve got here today.

We start off today with a couple of novels from Iain M. Banks, who comes up with some doozies — as in Surface Detail, a novel of the Culture, in which a sex slave is after revenge . . . → Read More: There’s Still Time

Revels

The Revels are a tradition unto themselves. We have a look at them today, first this year’s CD, Strike the Harp, which gives a good idea of this year’s Revels, and then a look at the show (celebration?) itself. the 2012 Revels at the Sanders Theater in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

And if you want to know . . . → Read More: Revels

And for your reading pleasure . . .

We have books. (Big surprise, that.)

First, let’s see what’s in store in Brandon Sanderson’s The Emperor’s Soul — how do you rebuild an Emperor in 100 days (or less)? Hint: failure is not an option.

Next, an anthology assembled by John Joseph Adams, Epic: Legends of Fantasy, that puts heroic fantasy in a new . . . → Read More: And for your reading pleasure . . .

Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Zombie

There’s actually a fairly long history for the fantasy detective genre, going back at least to Randall Garrett’s stories of Lord Darcy from the 1960s. The genre has enjoyed a roster of stellar practitioners — Michael Moorcock, Glenn Cook, Steven Brust, Tanya Huff, to name just a few. Add to that list Mike Resnick, who . . . → Read More: Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Zombie

You Were Warned

And here I am, back again with more reviews. Hmm — where to start?

Zombies! Cant’ live with ‘em, can’t live without ‘em — which seems to hold true for some people, at least. Christopher Golden has come out with an anthology that reinvents the zombie, according to our reviewer — 21st Century Dead. Or . . . → Read More: You Were Warned