Literary Matters: Viola Carr: The Diabolical Ms. Hyde

Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was first published in 1886, and has since been the basis for any number of stage productions, over 120 film adapations, radio plays, television movies and series, and of course, spoofs and parodies. And then there are the spin-offs by other novelists, which . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Viola Carr: The Diabolical Ms. Hyde

Literary Matters: Genevieve Cogman: The Invisible Library

What kind of person is equipped to writ a novel including alternate universes, steampunk, magic — and librarians? Well, let Cat Eldridge give you a clue:

[Genevieve Cogman’s] bio from the back of this novel is illuminating: ‘Genevieve Cogman started on Tolkien and Sherlock Holmes at an early age, and has never looked back. But . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Genevieve Cogman: The Invisible Library

Literary Matters: Steve Niles: Criminal Macabre: The Complete Cal McDonald Stories

If you thought you’d seen it all, guess again. We have a review from Cat Eldridge this morning of a group of stories about a man does see it all — and wishes he couldn’t.

The protagonist of these first person narrated stories, Cal McDonald, is a fucking mess. That’s a result of being able . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Steve Niles: Criminal Macabre: The Complete Cal McDonald Stories

Literary Matters: Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

We tend to be fairly enthusiastic about Roger Zelazny around here. He was, after all, one of the foremost figures in science fictions New Wave, and one of the most consistently inventive science fiction and fantasy writers ever. And we’ve reviewed a lot of his work, both novels and, as today, short stories, essays, and . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

Literary Matters: Steven Brust’s Hawk

With Hawk we reach number fourteen in Steven Brust’s Taltos Cycle, and things are about to change. Again.

Vlad Taltos is tired of being on the run. The Organization – House Jhereg – has been hunting him for what seems like most of his life (well, OK, he has broken a couple of the House’s . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Steven Brust’s Hawk

Literary Matters: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

There are lessons in Lucius Shepard’s Beautiful Blood, as reviewer Richard Dansky informs us.

It tells us that art slays dragons, no matter how large or powerful they may be.

It tells us that art takes a very long time to slay dragons, and that the dragon will be unaware of the poison that . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

Literary Matters: Pierce Brown: Red Rising

With the onslaught (and I use that word advisedly) of dystopian future/supernatural teen-oriented books and/or movies (and sometimes both) recently . . . well, I’m going to let reviewer Denise Kitashima Dutton set the stage:

Another dystopian future full of young adults who don’t know where they fit in? Nooooo, you cry! You’re sick to . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Pierce Brown: Red Rising

Literary Matters: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

We tend to think of the Green Man as a woodsy, countryside sort of figure, but there’s no reason that has to be the case. So, we have an anthology of short stories on the theme of the Urban Green Man, edited by Adria Laycraft and Janice Blaine.

Richard Dansky took a look at . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

Literary Matters: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Well, we’re back in working order, the pixies have been shooed away, and we have another review for you, this one of Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Dinosaurs, the latest in his Tales of the Weird West.

Interesting premise: two practitioners of the budding science of paleontology are digging for dinosaur bones — but . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Literary Matters: Charles Stross: Equoid

Our reviewers have been busy lately (probably all the rainy days — man, it’s been wet and gloomy), so we have some new reviews for you, starting with Richard Dansky’s look at Charles Stross’ Equoid.

Now, the title may be a stumper — what is an “equoid,” anyway — something not-quite-a-horse? A unicorn? My Little . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Charles Stross: Equoid