Literary Matters: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

There are lessons in Lucius Shepard’s Beautiful Blood, as reviewer Richard Dansky informs us.

It tells us that art slays dragons, no matter how large or powerful they may be.

It tells us that art takes a very long time to slay dragons, and that the dragon will be unaware of the poison that . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Lucius Shepard: Beautiful Blood

Literary Matters: Pierce Brown: Red Rising

With the onslaught (and I use that word advisedly) of dystopian future/supernatural teen-oriented books and/or movies (and sometimes both) recently . . . well, I’m going to let reviewer Denise Kitashima Dutton set the stage:

Another dystopian future full of young adults who don’t know where they fit in? Nooooo, you cry! You’re sick to . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Pierce Brown: Red Rising

Literary Matters: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

We tend to think of the Green Man as a woodsy, countryside sort of figure, but there’s no reason that has to be the case. So, we have an anthology of short stories on the theme of the Urban Green Man, edited by Adria Laycraft and Janice Blaine.

Richard Dansky took a look at . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Adria Laycraft & Janice Blaine (editors): Urban Green Man

Literary Matters: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Well, we’re back in working order, the pixies have been shooed away, and we have another review for you, this one of Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Dinosaurs, the latest in his Tales of the Weird West.

Interesting premise: two practitioners of the budding science of paleontology are digging for dinosaur bones — but . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Mike Resnick: The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

Literary Matters: Charles Stross: Equoid

Our reviewers have been busy lately (probably all the rainy days — man, it’s been wet and gloomy), so we have some new reviews for you, starting with Richard Dansky’s look at Charles Stross’ Equoid.

Now, the title may be a stumper — what is an “equoid,” anyway — something not-quite-a-horse? A unicorn? My Little . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Charles Stross: Equoid

Literary Matters: Glen Cook: The Tyranny of the Night / Lord of the Silent Kingdom

I’ve been an admirer of Glen Cook’s writing for many years, ever since I read Shadowline, the first book of the Starfishers series, way back when. I had never run into anyone who had quite that mix of myth and space opera, with the possible exception of Roger Zelazny, and Zelazny was not doing quite . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Glen Cook: The Tyranny of the Night / Lord of the Silent Kingdom

Literary Matters: Glen Cook: Working God’s Mischief

Arnhand, Castauriga, and Navaya lost their kings. The Grail Empire lost its empress. The Church lost its Patriarch, though he lives on as a fugitive. The Night lost Kharoulke the Windwalker, an emperor amongst the most primal and terrible gods. The Night goes on, in dread. The world goes on, in dread. The ice . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Glen Cook: Working God’s Mischief

Literary Matters: It’s Been a Nasty Winter

For some of us, at least. Fortunately, some hardy souls have managed to defy the elements and send in some new reviews, so let’s take a look.

First, Death’s Apprentice from K. W. Jeter and Gareth Jefferson Jones, featuring, among other things, a killer for hire to works for the Devil.

Next up, from steampunk . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: It’s Been a Nasty Winter

Musical Matters: Capercaillie: At the Heart of It All

I’m still working my way through Capercaillie, which, out of a host of interesting musicians from many traditions, remains one of the most engaging groups I’ve run across. At the Heart of It All, their newest release, seems to pull together a lot of what I’ve found in their earlier offerings into a very coherent . . . → Read More: Musical Matters: Capercaillie: At the Heart of It All

Musical Matters: Capercaillie: To the Moon

To the Moon was my first exposure to Capercaillie, so of course, it was what’s generally considered their “crossover” album. This is by no means a negative, or even something that’s very obvious: it’s more apparent in the rhythm patterns, the instrumentation (sorry, but no one is going to persuade me that the bouzouki is . . . → Read More: Musical Matters: Capercaillie: To the Moon