Literary Matters: Tim Powers’ Nobody’s Home

Tim Powers is well-known for taking an actual historical setting and taking that into something much more fanciful. So listen up as Richard Dansky tells us about his latest review:

Returning to the world of a much-beloved story doesn’t always work; George Lucas can tell us all about that. Any revisiting, especially one done after . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Tim Powers’ Nobody’s Home

The Year in Review: Charles de Lint

Here at the Kinrowan Estate, which publishes Green Man Review and Sleeping Hedgehog, Charles de Lint is one of our favourite writers, with both his music and writing being among the best we’ve seen this year. And this was the year that de Lint moved in the digital realm in a serious way!

Years . . . → Read More: The Year in Review: Charles de Lint

Madeleine L’Engle’s The Time Quartet

As far as I am concerned, Madeleine L’Engle’s books should be required reading in all schools, as they open doors — not only in the imagination, but also in the academics, math and science especially. These wonderful tales could inspire the next Einstein to take the proper courses and feed his mind. I enjoyed the . . . → Read More: Madeleine L’Engle’s The Time Quartet

The Blind Harper Dances

John O’Regan found The Blind Harper Dances — Modern English Country Dances set to airs by Turlough O’Carolan from Squirrel Hill Press a decade ago to be a reviewing challenge:

This book is at once fascinating and difficult to review. The fascination lies in the idea of combining the music of Turlough O’Carolan with modern . . . → Read More: The Blind Harper Dances

Ellen Kushner: Mannerpunk, Klezmer, and English ballads

Let the fairy-tale begin on a winter’s morning, then, with one drop of blood new-fallen on the ivory snow: a drop as bright as a clear-cut ruby, red as the single spot of claret on the lace cuff.

And thus starts Swordspoint: A Melodrama of Manners, the first novel in the Riverside series by Ellen . . . → Read More: Ellen Kushner: Mannerpunk, Klezmer, and English ballads

Charles de Lint: An Appreciation

OR Melling wrote this for our Charles de Lint edition…

It’s difficult to review Charles de Lint without getting personal and panegyrical for, as is the case with most if not all of his readers, I feel as if I have had a close relationship with him and his characters for many years now. Like . . . → Read More: Charles de Lint: An Appreciation

Retro Review: William Gibson’s Sprawl Trilogy

Wes Unruh wrote this review.

“The sky above the port was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel.” — from Neuromancer

The future world of the Sprawl series is a world of crumbling governments supplanted by multinational corporations, a world where horses are extinct, where money stratifies people into a global caste system. . . . → Read More: Retro Review: William Gibson’s Sprawl Trilogy

Gjallarhorn: Nordic Music for Your Consideration

We usually think of folk rock as being either of British or American in origin, say The Byrds or The Animals, both of which used folk sources in their music.

There’s also a lot of magic in the Finnish/Swedish music of Gjallarhorn. The didgeridoo, the percussion, the absolutely outstanding vocals, the lyrics. This is . . . → Read More: Gjallarhorn: Nordic Music for Your Consideration

Where the Wild Things Are

We start off this post with a work beloved by generations of children and more than a few adults as well that was written and illustrated by Maurice Sendak whose amazing illustrated work many of us greatly admire and it would eventually become a film which would in turn begat a full-length novel with . . . → Read More: Where the Wild Things Are

Changing Natures (An Estate Library comment)

I had forgotten that the library here at the Kinrowan Estate was undergoing a partial renovation too until Laith reminded me that this was happening. Now understand that I have no idea exactly what space(s) the library here occupies as no one including any of the Librarians are ever sure. It can be as small . . . → Read More: Changing Natures (An Estate Library comment)