Musical Matters: Kickstarter project: tunes from Charles de Lint’s The Little Country

I found this on Charles de Lint’s tumblr site:

I don’t recommend a lot of Kickstarter projects — mostly because I could fill up way too much space with all the worthy ones that are out there and I don’t want to inundate you. But this one from Zahatar is a little different.

The . . . → Read More: Musical Matters: Kickstarter project: tunes from Charles de Lint’s The Little Country

A new story from Charles de Lint: Sheriff Poole & The Mech Gang

Charles de Lint just put a new story up at Amazon and Smashwords.

Here’s what it’s about:

Sheriff Poole & The Mech Gang is set near de Lint’s fictional desert town of Santo del Vado Viejo, where his novels The Mystery of Grace and The Painted Boy take place, and where some of his recent . . . → Read More: A new story from Charles de Lint: Sheriff Poole & The Mech Gang

Literary Matters: The Cats of Tanglewood Forest

I got the galley for this collaborative affair by writer Charles de Lint and artist Charles Vess way back in August of last year, if memory serves me right. However, that galley was missing one essential aspect of the story as the artwork, though charming, was but the preliminary black and white sketches for the . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: The Cats of Tanglewood Forest

Rick Hautala

Rick Hautala, well-known horror writer and well-liked person, passed away this week from a heart attack. Cristopher Golden, a past Oak King here and a fine writer in his own regard, sent out this letter in hopes of heliping Holly, his widow, with her finances:

Dear friends,

            I don’t have the words to put Rick . . . → Read More: Rick Hautala

And The Word Was Spoken

‘Tell me just this, if it is not a secret: what other great powers are there besides the light?’   ‘It is no secret. All power is one in source and end, I think. Years and distances, stars and candles, water and wind and wizardry, the craft in a man’s hand and the wisdom in . . . → Read More: And The Word Was Spoken

Kate Griffin: The Minority Council

The Minority Council, the fourth novel in Kate Griffin’s Midnight Mayor series, puts Matthew Swift, the current Midnight Mayor of London, is more peril of his and the Electric Blue Angels’ existence than in any of the previous novels as an evil far greater than anything he (they) have faced before is loose upon London.

. . . → Read More: Kate Griffin: The Minority Council

A Horse flies side-project

The Horse Flies are one of the best Americana bands playing now and their side-projects are just interesting as the many, many recordings the band has released down the last several decades.

Late Last Summer, an album of waltzes by Horseflies violinist Judy Hyman and her dad, Dick had its ‘official’ release date on . . . → Read More: A Horse flies side-project

On the Story of Robert Holdstock’s Merlin’s Wood, or The Vision of Magic

Merlin’s Wood is not precisely part of Robert Holdstock’s Ryhope Wood cycle, as it is set in France, not England. For an author whose other books in the Mythago Wood cycle are English in motif, this is an odd digression. The rest of the Ryhope Wood cycle takes place in and around Ryhope Wood in . . . → Read More: On the Story of Robert Holdstock’s Merlin’s Wood, or The Vision of Magic

Bone Forest: The True Beginnings of the Holdstock’s Ryhope Wood series

Robert Holdstock’s best known for his sprawling Ryhope Wood series, which encompasses, most readers think, four complex novels: Mythago Wood, Lavondyss The Hollowing, Gate of Ivory, Gate of Horn, and Avillion. Of course they are some of the finest writing in the English langage, but as Richard Dansky noted in his review of them,

The . . . → Read More: Bone Forest: The True Beginnings of the Holdstock’s Ryhope Wood series

James Hetley’s Summer Country

‘The fiddle chased him and pounced, and then the two instruments rolled around like a pair of kittens playing with a catnip mouse. A flute joined in, and the ball of fur turned into rambunctious reel, one Brian had never heard before. And then the deep booming of the drum nipped one of them . . . → Read More: James Hetley’s Summer Country