Literary Matters: Viola Carr: The Diabolical Ms. Hyde

Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was first published in 1886, and has since been the basis for any number of stage productions, over 120 film adapations, radio plays, television movies and series, and of course, spoofs and parodies. And then there are the spin-offs by other novelists, which . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Viola Carr: The Diabolical Ms. Hyde

Literary Matters: Genevieve Cogman: The Invisible Library

What kind of person is equipped to writ a novel including alternate universes, steampunk, magic — and librarians? Well, let Cat Eldridge give you a clue:

[Genevieve Cogman’s] bio from the back of this novel is illuminating: ‘Genevieve Cogman started on Tolkien and Sherlock Holmes at an early age, and has never looked back. But . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Genevieve Cogman: The Invisible Library

Literary Matters: Steve Niles: Criminal Macabre: The Complete Cal McDonald Stories

If you thought you’d seen it all, guess again. We have a review from Cat Eldridge this morning of a group of stories about a man does see it all — and wishes he couldn’t.

The protagonist of these first person narrated stories, Cal McDonald, is a fucking mess. That’s a result of being able . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Steve Niles: Criminal Macabre: The Complete Cal McDonald Stories

Literary Matters: Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

We tend to be fairly enthusiastic about Roger Zelazny around here. He was, after all, one of the foremost figures in science fictions New Wave, and one of the most consistently inventive science fiction and fantasy writers ever. And we’ve reviewed a lot of his work, both novels and, as today, short stories, essays, and . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Roger Zelazny; Donald S. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kivas and Ann Crimmins (eds.): Last Exit to Babylon: The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny, Volume 4

Literary Matters: Tanya Huff: A Confederation of Valor

I’m a long-time fan of military science fiction having read my way through the entire of Neal Asher’s Polity and a much older series as well, Poul Anderson’s Flandry. I however had not known that Tanya Huff whose most excellent urban fantasies I’ve read did military sf. And it appears our reviewer, Robert Tilendis, came . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Tanya Huff: A Confederation of Valor

Literary Matters: Cherie Priest: Jacaranda

Cherie Priest has been doing a bizarre mashup of alternate history, zombie, steampunk, and Old West tropes for sometime now. It’s fun stuff which is popcorn literature at its very best. The latest is Jacaranda which Richard Dansky says that ‘ the most recent entry in Cherie Priest’s Clockwork Century alternate history, reads like a . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Cherie Priest: Jacaranda

Literary Matters: Simon R. Green’s Once in a Blue Moon

Simon R. Green has a number of series set in one complicated metaverse: the Secret Histories with the Droods who protect humanity, the Ghost Finders who deal with the things that do far worse than go bump in the night, the Nightside series which is about John Taylor, a PI operating in the secret, rotten . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Simon R. Green’s Once in a Blue Moon

Literary Matters: Clive Barker: Tortured Souls: The Legend of Primordium

No writers intentionally writes something that a reviewer doesn’t like, and no fan of that writer ever wants to see a review that is not favourable to that writer. Unfortunately this will happen to every writer at some point and so it was with this review by Richard Dansky of this novella:

Everything about the . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Clive Barker: Tortured Souls: The Legend of Primordium

Literary Matters: Tim Powers’ Nobody’s Home

Tim Powers is well-known for taking an actual historical setting and taking that into something much more fanciful. So listen up as Richard Dansky tells us about his latest review:

Returning to the world of a much-beloved story doesn’t always work; George Lucas can tell us all about that. Any revisiting, especially one done after . . . → Read More: Literary Matters: Tim Powers’ Nobody’s Home

Music Matters: Up in The Air: Moonshine / Gavin Marwick: The Long Road and The Far Horizon

I’ve seen Gavin perform a half dozen times both in his native Scotland and down London. He never fails to anything but a stellar musician, be he solo or performing with one of the bands that he’s been in.

So what does our reviewer say about his two latest music undertakings? Quite a bit actually. . . . → Read More: Music Matters: Up in The Air: Moonshine / Gavin Marwick: The Long Road and The Far Horizon